Dr Ahmed Ismail

Consultant Gynaecologist & Fertility Expert

 

Skin Rash and Pruritis in pregnancy

 

                   The rash is intensely itchy, and consists of pruritic urticarial papules that coalesce into plaques. Typically, it starts on the abdomen, but the umbilicus region is usually spared. It may later develop into widespread non-urticated erythema, with eczematous lesions and vesicles.

It poses no serious risk to the woman or her baby; symptoms last 4–6 weeks on average, and usually resolve immediately following birth.

Symptomatic treatment includes emollients, moderately-potent corticosteroids, and sedating antihistamines.

Atopic eruption in pregnancy commonly presents in the first trimester. It is more likely in women with a history of atopic eczema.

The rash is itchy and consists of eczematous lesions and papular lesions.

Although it poses no serious risk to the woman or her baby, the child may be at increased risk of developing atopic eczema, and there is a risk of recurrence in future pregnancies.

Symptomatic treatment includes emollients, moderately-potent corticosteroids, and sedating antihistamines.

Pruritic folliculitis of pregnancy occurs in the second or third trimester, and is relatively rare.

The rash consists of multiple follicular papules affecting the upper back, arms, chest, and abdomen.

It poses no serious risk to the woman or her baby, and resolves shortly after birth.

Symptomatic treatment includes topical benzoyl peroxide and mild potency topical corticosteroids.

Pemphigoid gestationis is very rare.

An intense itch often precedes the rash, which initially presents with erythematous urticarial papules and plaques on the abdomen (and nearly always the umbilicus), but may spread to cover the entire body and progress to form tense blisters.

The woman is likely to have exacerbations and remissions throughout the pregnancy. The baby may be small for its birth date, but there is no increased risk of prematurity or stillbirth. There is also about a 10% chance of mild and transient skin lesions in the newborn baby.

Referral should be made to dermatology or obstetrics for additional antenatal surveillance and corticosteroid treatment for flare-ups.

 

 

For appointments please call

Queens Clinic

96 Harley Street,

London W1G 7HY

Tel: 0207 935 66 00 and 0207 935 55 40

 

 

 
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